IFOAM.BIO

Join us for
#IGrowYourFood

Browse this page to learn tips and tricks on
how to make films and share your stories!

#IGrowYourFood is a global action day celebrating the men and women who grow our food sustainably. On September 25, we invite farmers around the world to share their work, the challenges they face, and how we can support them.

How to prepare?

We know that finding the right way to express yourself can often be a challenge, whether you are writing an article, doing a photo story or making a video. We therefore put together some tips and tricks we hope will help.

Create your own video
Sample Script
Supporting Messages

Join us on September 25

On September 25, join us in amplifying farmers’ voices by sharing stories, videos, pictures, memes and articles across social media using the hashtags #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic.


Film and Photography

Capture your Story!

We know that finding the right way to express yourself can often be a challenge, whether you are writing an article, doing a photo story or making a video. We therefore put together some tips and tricks we hope will help.


Tips on Taking Better Photographs

Simple tips to level up your photography!

English | Español | Français

Consent Form for Footage / Photography

Use this form to submit your consent to having your video and photo used in the campaign.

Español | Français


Editing Your Own Videos

If you don't manage the perfect take when filming, you can use free editing apps directly on your smartphone to edit. We also have an ending slide you can add to your video to be part of the campaign.

Video Editing Apps:

Add this slide onto the end of your videos.


Craft Your Message

Tell it like it is!

Firstly, decide what is at the heart of the message you want to share. Do you want to tell us about the changes you have noticed in your soil, how you have more wildlife on your farm or the effects of climate change? Perhaps you prefer to talk about the impact organic has had on your livelihood, food security or why it is important to empower women farmers? Keep reading, you will find some supporting facts for these and more!

As a general rule, try to shape your video around the following:

  • What is your message?
  • How does organic farming address this?
  • What are you doing about this? Or what difference has organic farming made?
  • What can policy-makers and/or citizens do to make a difference?

“Did you know that smallholders provide up to 80 percent of the food supply in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa?

Hello, my name is Sara and I am one of the smallholder farmers, growing your food. I am from Namibia and I decided to use organic methods instead of chemical pesticides on my farm. The pesticides poison the soil and also kill other important living organisms living in it like the earth worms.

I chose to adopt organic methods because it improved the soil quality and made my crops rich in nutrients and healthier to eat. I now make sure to use natural methods like crop rotation and manure application to control pests and fertilize the soils. I also inform my customers about the benefits of eating organic food and encourage them to visit my farm to see where their food comes from.

I encourage more citizens to choose organic food because it is not only healthy for humans, but also for the environment; and it ensures that even our children and grandchildren will be able to benefit from the same land.”


Support Your Message

Facts and Figures

Biodiversity

Messages
  • Habitat loss is the main threat to 85 - 90% of all species described by the IUCN as ‘threatened’ or ‘endangered’
  • 75% of agricultural crop diversity (agrobiodiversity) has been lost in the last 100 years
  • Organically farmed land has on average 30% more species than conventionally farmed areas
  • Organic practices such as crop rotation and crop diversity promote agrobiodiversity
Call to Action
  • Citizens can help protect wildlife by choosing organic
  • Policymakers can support the use of more sustainable farming practices by rewarding farmers for nature-friendly farming practices

Farmers & Livelihoods

Messages
  • Smallholders provide up to 80 percent of the food supply in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.
  • There are over 570 million farms worldwide of which more than 90% are run by an individual or family
  • Family farms generate 40-60% of rural income in developing countries
  • Agriculture is a major source of income for rural livelihoods for more than 60% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • There are about 500 million smallholder farming households
  • Farmers are often the most affected by poverty, hunger and the impacts of climate change
  • Organic agriculture can be a sustainable source of income for rural livelihoods
Call to Action
  • Citizens can choose to buy organic food from their local farmers
  • Policymakers can support smallholder farmers by providing training on how to farm organically

Soil

Messages
  • 33% of the world's farmland is highly degraded. Soils are a non-renewable resource on which 95% of our food supply depends
  • One teaspoon of soil treated with chemicals has few helpful bacteria
  • Organic agriculture does not use harmful inputs like synthetic pesticides that harm the soil and ecosystem
  • Organic nourishes the soils. A teaspoon of soil that is organically treated usually hosts billions of microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi
  • By applying practices that return carbon to the soil, we can increase the quantity of carbon stored in soils and slow down global warming
Call to Action
  • Citizens can support their local farmers by objecting to policies that promote the use of harmful inputs within their communities

Food & Nutrition

Messages
  • Poor nutrition affects our ability to learn at all stages of life, especially children who can have trouble concentrating in school
  • Nutrition-sensitive agriculture, based on the principles of organic agriculture, is an effective tool to fight malnutrition
  • Citizens can include fresh organic vegetables and fruits in their diet as a way to improve their health and prevent malnutrition
Call to Action
  • Policymakers can include organic agriculture in school curriculums to raise awareness of healthy foods and diets
  • Policymakers can link farmers to the markets so as to increase the availability of organic produce in the community

Climate Change

Messages
  • One third of the world’s cropland area is used to grow food for animal feed
  • Climate-driven effects like drought and famine can lead to food and livelihood insecurity
  • 2.5 billion small-scale farmers and forest-dependent communities are the most vulnerable to climate change and natural hazards
  • Agriculture is the sector contributing the most to nitrous oxide emissions which damages the ozone layer that protects us from the sun's ultraviolet radiation
Call to Action
  • Citizens can choose to buy seasonal, locally grown, organic produce
  • Policymakers can discourage unsustainable livestock production by subsidizing organic farmers using organic practices, for example, free-range grazing

Harmful Inputs

Messages
  • Pesticides are responsible for an estimated 220,000 deaths from pesticide poisoning each year, 99% of which occur in the global south
  • Instead of spraying glyphosate, organic farmers use crop rotation as a weed and pest control method
  • Eliminating the use of chemical fertilizers can avoid chemical runoff into water streams, rivers and lakes. This ensures that our water resources are safe to drink from and also for fish to live in
Call to Action
  • Policymakers can ban the use of chemicals and pesticides that harm the soil like those containing glyphosate

Gender

Messages
  • Only 12.8% of women are agricultural landholders in the world
  • Due to a knowledge gap, women-run farms tend to produce 20 to 30 percent less than farms run by men, even if they work more hours than men annually
  • Women’s full participation in agriculture is often hindered by issues such as access to land, education and financial resources
  • Organic agriculture ensures that women have access to healthier, diversified and nutritious food
  • When women work, economies grow. When you empower a rural woman, you empower the whole community.
Call to Action
  • Policymakers can increase the access of women farmers to resources like secure land tenure. This could increase yields on their farms by 20 - 30 percent

Seed

Messages
  • Communities are displaced by agribusiness expansion and lose plant varieties due to genetic contamination
  • Farmers are not only denied the right to save seeds but can also be prosecuted for infringing seed patents
  • Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) seeds are genetically unstable and we do not know enough about them
  • Organic agriculture promotes the use of indigenous seeds that are highly adaptive to changes in their environment
Call to Action
  • Policymakers can support farmers in starting seed banks to preserve local or native seed species
  • Policymakers can defend the farmers’ right to save seeds, recognizing farmers as the custodians of seeds and their vital role in conserving agrobiodiversity

September 25, 2020

Celebrate Farmers on the
#IGrowYourFood Action Day

#IGrowYourFood is a global action day celebrating anyone involved in growing food using organic and agroecological practices—whether you’re a farmer or a processor, producer, exporter, trader or organiser.

Social Media Toolkit

Copy, paste, and publish!
It's that easy.

Create Your Own Video

We've put together some tips to making your own video

DIY Kit

Create your own messages with #IGrowYourFood branding.

Now you’ve prepared your content, here’s what you should do on the day!

On September 25th:

Help us create a Twitter storm!

As many organizations/people as possible should tweet simultaneously between 11:00-13:00 CEST and 17:00-19:00 CEST using #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic to get the topic trending.

  • Start tweeting at 11:00 CEST and make sure to use the hashtags #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic. Your tweet could be anything from your own video, a link to an article or a retweet. Use our Social Media Kit for content ideas or find facts and figures to support your message here.
  • Find us on Twitter to like and share our tweets. Throughout the day, we’ll be amplifying content using #IGrowYourFood.
  • Click on #IGrowYourFood to see what everyone else is posting and tweet or retweet as much content as possible between 11:00-13:00 CEST and 17:00-19:00 CEST, always using #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic.
  • Feel free to keep tweeting outside those windows, too.

Throughout the day, we’ll be sharing article links and posting videos. We can make these videos available for you to cross-post, too! Let us know if you’re interested by September 25th at communications@ifoam.bio.

  • From 11am CEST, post something using the hashtags #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic. Your post could be anything from a video to a picture, meme, article link or your own story.
  • Post as often as you like throughout #IGrowYourFood day! Share your experiences or opinions on topics that matter to you—soil, chemical input, biodiversity… Use our Social Media Kit for content ideas or find facts and figures to support your message here.
  • Go to our Facebook page to like and share IFOAM’s content with your followers.
  • Click on #IGrowYourFood to see what everyone else is posting and like and share their content to help amplify their voice!

Throughout the day, we’ll be sharing article links and posting videos. We can make these videos available for you to cross-post, too! Let us know if you’re interested by September 25th at communications@ifoam.bio.

  • At 11am CEST, post using the hashtags #IGrowYourFood and #LuvOrganic. Your post could be a video, a picture, a meme—anything that fits your message.
  • Post as often as you like throughout #IGrowYourFood day! Share your experiences or opinions on topics that matter to you—soil, chemical input, biodiversity… Use our Social Media Kit for content ideas or find facts and figures to support your message here.
  • Follow our Instagram page (@ifoamorganics) to like and share IFOAM’s content.
  • Click on #IGrowYourFood to see what everyone else is posting.
  • Like their content to help amplify their voice!

Get Inspired

#IGrowYourFood Stories from 2019

Joseph Lwevuze

Kampala, Uganda

"By growing bananas & coffee, it is possible for farmers to earn an income on a daily, weekly & monthly basis"

Fergal

Galway, Ireland

“My message to policy-makers is this - Stop listening to agri-business, stop listening the pesticide and herbicide manufacturers. Start listening to your citizens and support small-scale agroecological production”

Helena Švermová

Czech Republic

"I regard the land as a gift. We try our best to approach it with humility and gratitude."